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Home Events Details - PEN WOLRD VOICES OF LITERATURE
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Event 

Title:
PEN WOLRD VOICES OF LITERATURE
When:
04.29.2013 - 05.05.2013 
Category:
Book Reading

Description

PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature: NYC, April 29-May 5, 2013

Schedule of Events


Bravery in art, democracy in politics, and the sheer raw zeniths and nadirs of modern life: Join us as we kick off the 2013 PEN World Voices Festival with this exciting event. Bringing together writers from different countries, genres, and disciplines to read from their works, The Opening Night event is a perfect preview of what is to come. Hosted by Bartunde Thurston.
Monday
April 29
8:00 pm-8:00 pm

participants

 

A collaboration with Tim Etchells, this event exposes the strange magic at the heart of the reading experience. Two audience members sit side-by-side, taking cues from words both written and whispered—via an iPod and headphones—and find themselves burrowing an unlikely path through a pile of books.
Tuesday
April 30
10:00 am-12:00 pm

participants

 

SOLD OUT — Celebrated novelist, screenwriter, and memoirist, A.M. Homes turns her attention to the visual arts. Already a writer? Become a polymath. A lover of literature? Experiment now with images.
Tuesday
April 30
1:00 pm-3:00 pm

participants

 

In a rare visit to New York City, Earl Lovelace—acclaimed Caribbean writer and explorer of post-independence politics—will address how one can reclaim rebellion from forces that might co-opt it. Doesn’t get any braver than that.
Tuesday
April 30
7:00 pm-10:30 pm

participants

 

Philip Roth will be presented with the PEN Literary Service Award. Mr. Roth will reflect on his lifetime of literary endeavor and his personal involvement in promoting freedom and democracy in Eastern Europe. The PEN Gala is a unique social event where distinguished American and international writers host more than 500 guests who support PEN’s work securing the liberty of imprisoned writers of conscience worldwide, defending freedom of expression wherever it is threatened, and promoting literature and international cultural exchange.
Tuesday
April 30
7:00 pm-8:30 pm

participants

 

Shahrnush Parsipur’s writing career began in 1974 with the publication of her first novel, The Dog and the Long Winter. On this night Parsiup will discuss her work, her political exile, and her recent collaborations.
Tuesday
April 30
9:00 pm-10:00 pm

participants

 

Noted philosopher and notorious obsessor Simon Critchley will share his fascination with memory theaters. Critchley will talk about how the occult and hermetic arts of memory were revived in the Italian Renaissance, in Shakespeare, and mobilized in Hegel before turning to his own attempt to build a memory theatre in the Netherlands.
McSweeney’s contributors will read excerpts from their translations in McSweeney’s Issue 42—an ambitious experiment which took twelve stories through six phases of translation of a variety of languages, granting each translator a liberal creative license to change the story at will.
Wednesday
May 01
10:00 am-12:00 pm

participants

 

SOLD OUT - Renowned illustrator, designer, and author, Maira Kalman will invite workshop attendees over for a cup of tea. Come prepared to be in the moment with a literary legend.
Wednesday
May 01
12:00 pm-8:00 pm

participants

 

An Autoteatro experience for two, Cue China (Elsewhere, Offshore) asks the pair to face each other through a glass teleprompter, which reveals a video conversation between creator Ant Hampton and a recently injured factory worker from China.
Wednesday
May 01
1:00 pm-3:00 pm

participants

 

In a digital, post-political age, Jacobin, a young political print journal, has managed to thrive. Its founder covers the utility of intellectual journals in the 21st century, the future prospects for the form, and how “hyper-capitalist” publishing tactics have served his radical political ends.
Wednesday
May 01
6:30 pm-8:00 pm
The style, attitude, and role of book criticism differs from country to country. This panel will explore how reviewers and book reviews shape-shift across borders, even as each country’s literary culture forms its own responses to political, technological, and aesthetic changes.
PEN World Voices joins with Asia Society, A Public Space, and Monkey Business International—the acclaimed English-language anthology of newly translated Japanese writing—for a cabaret-style night of readings, conversation, and music. Hosted by Japanamerica author Roland Kelts.
Wednesday
May 01
7:00 pm-8:30 pm
Why are confessional narratives penned by female writers so often deemed “brave,” “sticky,” or “opportunistic,” when the same material addressed by male writers is called by its name: art? Join Guernica magazine to confess, grieve, or take jabs at the glaring double-standard in how personal writing is consumed, marketed, and reviewed today.
PEN World Voices Festival teams up with The Poetry Society of America to present an evening of readings and dialogue on the importance of moral courage and bravery in the creation of poetry.
Wednesday
May 01
9:00 pm-10:00 pm

participants

 

Longtime editor Lewis Lapham—who helmed Harper’s for three decades—is also a longtime smoker. He will discuss the virtues of smoking and his love of the act, despite its faults and much-maligned reputation. A psychoanalyst will join him onstage.
Wednesday
May 01
9:30 pm-11:00 pm
Speaking in Vanishing Tongues will showcase performances and readings of the languages discussed. This is a rare chance to engage in the beautiful and unique sounds of these endangered languages.
Thursday
May 02
1:00 pm-3:00 pm
Translating is hard, and surviving as a literary translator is arguably even harder. Acclaimed translator and PEN Translation Committee Chair Susan Bernofsky offers up some tips for navigating the rough waters of copyrights, permissions, publishing, getting paid, and then getting to do it all over again.
Thursday
May 02
4:00 pm-5:30 pm
Each year, a group of Festival authors are invited by Baruch College’s Great Works program to comment on a classic work of literature or author that influenced their own work. Panelists speak about the great works that affected them, read from their own work or their chosen classic text to illustrate the impact, then engage in discussion with the audience.
Thursday
May 02
6:30 pm-8:00 pm
Since her first collection of stories, At the Bottom of the River, Jamaica Kincaid has been a leading chronicler of Caribbean culture and tradition. Join us for this frank discussion between two writers who reveal the disparity between the way the world is and the way it could be.

PEN Members and students with valid ID-Buy tickets to all four events in the Dialogue Series for $60/$50 PEN Members
Thursday
May 02
6:30 pm-8:00 pm
Great friendships are the building blocks of great art. Acclaimed novelist Norman Manea will talk with longtime friend and famed Italian essayist Claudio Magris. Magris is making a rare visit to New York to promote his new novel, Blindly, narrated by a mysterious pazzo lucido (a lucid madman), who “plays” all of the story’s various characters.
Thursday
May 02
8:30 pm-10:00 pm
Acclaimed poet and author of the novel Push, Sapphire is a relentless advocate for change. Don’t miss this engaging dialogue between two writers of formidable talent.
Thursday
May 02
9:00 pm-10:00 pm
Author and essayist Andrew Solomon has written on a widely divergent range of topics, including Soviet artists, Libyan governance, childrearing, and the politics of the deaf. For this event, his famously obsessive attention will focus on the topic of sleep.
Friday
May 03
10:00 am-12:00 pm

participants

 

"Not by the book: one writer's answers to questions most writers ask.” Part of the Literary Mews mini-festival.
Friday
May 03
10:00 am-12:00 pm

participants

 

Friday
May 03
10:00 am-12:00 pm

participants

 

Inspired by the Barbara Frischmuth’s garden books, the workshop asks gardeners and garden-lovers alike, do you have a garden in your imagination? And if you do, how does the garden and it’s ecology interact with your daily physical world?
Friday
May 03
10:00 am-10:00 am

participants

 

Friday
May 03
10:00 am-12:00 pm

participants

 

Part of the Literary Mews mini-festival.
Friday
May 03
10:00 am-12:00 pm

participants

 

James Bryne, editor and founder of the acclaimed journal The Wolf, will lead a workshop on translating Burmese poetry.
Friday
May 03
10:00 am-7:30 pm
PEN reimagines the New York City street festival as an open air indie book fair. Nestled among the cobblestone streets of NYU’s storied Washington Mews, this day-long “festival within the Festival” will feature writers’ workshops in the morning and readings in the afternoon. Browse the tables where literary magazines and independent presses proffer the work of up-and-coming writers, wander the streets and cross borders as the doors to NYU’s International Houses are opened, or stop to take in busking musicians or a puppet show.
Friday
May 03
10:00 am-12:00 pm

participants

 

SOLD OUT — In this workshop, Téa Obreht will focus on the mythic traditions in storytelling and explore how specific narrative predilections shape our instincts and responses to fiction.
Friday
May 03
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

participants

 

Participants will get an insider’s view into photographer Nancy Crampton's encounters with authors including W.H. Auden, James Baldwin, Anne Sexton, Lucille Clifton, and Gwendolyn Brooks.
Friday
May 03
1:00 pm-3:00 pm

participants

 

You have your MFA. Now what? Lynne Tillman, beloved novelist and cultural critic, will lead an expedition through the possible routes that an emerging writer might follow.
Friday
May 03
1:30 pm-3:00 pm
Award-winning actress Fiona Shaw, writer Colm Tóibín, and director Deborah Warner discuss the process of bringing The Testament of Mary, Tóibín’s adaptation of his 2012 novella, to the Broadway stage.
Friday
May 03
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
What happens when writers switch from their mother tongue to a language that requires them to paraphrase what cannot be translated directly, a process that reveals to them the blind spots of perception in both languages?
Friday
May 03
4:00 pm-6:00 pm

participants

 

A/P/A is proud to host Iranian feminist writer Shahrnush Parsipur. Her memoir, Kissing the Sword, captures the surreal experience of serving time without being charged with a crime and witnessing the systematic destruction of any and all opposition to fundamentalist power.
Friday
May 03
4:00 pm-6:00 pm

participants

 

Friday
May 03
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
Part of the Literary Mews mini-festival. A panel discussion featuring Igoni Barrett, Mukoma Wa Ngugi, NoViolet Bulawayo & Olufemi Terry.
Friday
May 03
5:00 pm-7:00 pm
Zeyar Lynn and Khin Aung Aye read from Bones Will Crow, edited and translated by ko ko thett and NYU alumnus James Byrne.
Friday
May 03
6:00 pm-7:30 pm

participants

 

Part of the Literary Mews mini-festival.
Explorers may discover a bedside reading, a dinner-table discussion, or a poet in the elevator at this event, where each participant is given a map and left to roam the halls of the city’s oldest and largest artist community: the notoriously labyrinthine Westbeth Artists’ Housing.
Friday
May 03
6:30 pm-8:00 pm
Vasily Grossman’s career as a novelist and reporter extended from the depth of Stalin’s terror in the 1930s to the slushy uncertainties of Kruschev’s thaw. Along the way, he wrote one of the masterpieces of twentieth-century literature, Life and Fate. This panel will explore the life and work of a writer intimately acquainted with questions of courage and cowardice, for whom fiction was nothing if not the pursuit of truth.
Friday
May 03
6:30 pm-8:00 pm
At dinner parties, on editorial pages, from academic lecterns, and in myriad other forums, the impact of the digital age on publishing has been widely discussed. Now, a panel of industry heavy-hitters, will take the conversation to the next level; by discussing the discussion itself.
Friday
May 03
7:00 pm-8:30 pm
SOLD OUT - Don’t miss internationally acclaimed author Salman Rushdie on issues of bravery, democracy, and freedom of expression.
Friday
May 03
7:00 pm-10:00 pm

participants

 

The Bureau of Apology is, at first glance, simply an office. Looks are deceiving and patterns can be quickly deciphered as a murky kind of bureaucratic hell begins to emerge. Visitors will be asked to participate in a progressive set of tasks, including the decision to reveal (or conceal) an innermost truth.
Friday
May 03
7:00 pm-8:30 pm
In The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, Milan Kundera writes: “The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting.” This perspective—one that bears the mark of life under a totalitarian regime in which repression often took the form of enforced forgetting—assumes that remembering is always a virtue, and that to not remember is a failure. This event will explore how the humanities and the sciences engage with the various functions and values of forgetting.
Friday
May 03
8:30 pm-10:00 pm

participants

 

In this candid dialogue, essayist Fran Lebowitz will weigh in on bravery in art. Timelessly hip, sardonic, and New-York-to-the-marrow, Lebowitz was recently the subject of Public Speaking, a documentary film by Martin Scorsese.
A Festival favorite for six years running, this event delves into the change that happens when one text is translated into another. The battle plays out in an onstage Slam, wherein a poet reads from his or her work in its original language, followed by a translator who will choose English words to replace the original text.
Friday
May 03
9:00 pm-10:00 pm
Native American poet, performer, and author of the memoir Crazy Brave, Joy Harjo will discuss her interest in the depth, scope, and passage of time.
Saturday
May 04
1:00 pm-2:30 pm
Writers for children and young adults show how people interact with nature, and reveal the world as a fascinating and ever-changing place with troubles all its own—rising temperatures, shrinking ice caps, and decreasing biodiversity.
Saturday
May 04
1:00 pm-2:30 pm
Focusing on the harrowing events at Guantánamo and on the courage of those in the military and intelligence services who created a written record of those events, this program will explore the role that writing can play in witnessing—and confronting—human rights abuses. What goes into the decision to write something down? What happens when you do? Does the act of writing alter events and transform its subject? Does it transform the writer?
Saturday
May 04
1:00 pm-3:00 pm

participants

 

Inspired by the Barbara Frischmuth’s garden books, the workshop asks gardeners and garden-lovers alike, do you have a garden in your imagination? And if you do, how does the garden and it’s ecology interact with your daily physical world?
Saturday
May 04
1:00 pm-5:00 pm
In the winter of 2013, PEN, alongside the Architectural League of New York and IDEAS CITY Festival, commissioned ten emerging architects to design their take on the idea of the Little Free Library. On May 4, the ten little libraries will be built and “planted” in neighborhoods across New York City.
Saturday
May 04
2:00 pm-3:30 pm
Paul Auster and Charles Simic join Gen’ichiro Takahashi, one of Japan’s leading novelists and critics, and Mina Ishikawa, a fresh new voice in tanka poetry, for an intriguing cross-cultural encounter. The conversation will be facilitated by eminent translators Motoyuki Shibata and Ted Goossen, the editors of the acclaimed English-language anthology of newly translated Japanese writing, Monkey Business International.
Saturday
May 04
2:00 pm-3:30 pm
PEN World Voices Festival invites you into the world of the New York City cabbie: a fractured place where isolation meets socialization and entrepreneurial impulses can be at odds with the job description of getting from point A to point B.
Saturday
May 04
3:00 pm-4:30 pm
In the United States, the growth of the prison industry is largely a result of policy changes—not actual crime rates. The punishing post-release design assures that ever larger segments of the population—particularly people of color, the young, and the mentally ill—are thwarted when trying to re-integrate into their communities. This panel discusses this form of institutionalized racism and how we can implement change through the legal system and through education.
Saturday
May 04
3:00 pm-4:30 pm
This panel will discuss endangered languages and why we must preserve them, using British Columbia, Mexico, and Wales as examples of how some cultures work with their indigenous languages.
Saturday
May 04
3:00 pm-4:30 pm
For the first time in the Festival’s history, PEN brings together a panel of leading Palestinian writers to take their place in the global literary community. From Palestine and from the diaspora, they will share their work, experiences, and visions, revealing how a literature is both imagined and created under occupation, siege, and exile.
Saturday
May 04
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
Celebrated Uruguayan storyteller and chronicler of history’s forgotten, Eduardo Galeano, talks about the intersection of literature and politics. This session will explore the place where the political can become the poetic and where poetry is unafraid of politics.
Saturday
May 04
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
Working with PEN chapters in South Africa, this panel will focus discussion on literature and accountability in the new South Africa. Does the literary community reflect the country’s demographics? Can literature unpack questions of corruption from a legacy of racism?
Saturday
May 04
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
For many novelists, describing the city where a story takes place is as fundamental as providing a well-developed protagonist. The panel will look at how the city both limits and liberates, how it is informed by collective knowledge and individual exploration, and how, particularly in the era of globalization, it can be a place of imposing history and rapid reinvention.
Saturday
May 04
7:00 pm-8:30 pm
Lapham’s Quarterly and PEN World Voices present an evening on “Bravery.” Enjoy a cabaret-style program of historical readings and songs by actors and writers on the theme of bravery at Joe’s Pub.
Saturday
May 04
7:00 pm-8:30 pm

participants

 

The prisoner’s imagination often pens journals, stories, letters, poems, or legal briefs. Writing has the power to enhance critical thinking, afford solace, and refine itself through practice. These writings might later become the currency of betrayal, confiscation, retribution, surveillance, damning evidence, and even result in further confinement. When perceived as a crime or safety risk, writing becomes a subversion, a threat. Simultaneously, the official written rules and decisions of a prison can appropriate, deform, and obfuscate language for control and institutional gain.
Saturday
May 04
8:00 pm-10:00 pm
In 1947, the European School initiated a project called the Invisible Symposium. Artists from a variety of disciplines—writers, visual artists, philosophers, and editors—were asked the same set of questions. The 2013 PEN World Voices Festival mounts its own Invisible Symposium, with a focus on the current state of democracy.
Saturday
May 04
9:00 pm-10:00 pm

participants

 

Feminist author and provocateur Naomi Wolf, whose most recent book, Vagina: A New Biography, rocked the 2012 bestseller lists, will turn now her attention (and yours!) toward the topic of truth. Joined onstage by a psychologist and neurobiologist.
Sunday
May 05
1:00 pm-2:30 pm
Cultural strategist and deputy director of the New Museum Karen Wong and the charismatic Archie Gottesman will explore the boundaries and limitations of marketing and public presence and discuss the exciting and imaginative new ground that can be broken when storytelling and business intersect.
Sunday
May 05
1:00 pm-2:30 pm
Is there anything we can do, as writers and translators, to break the causal chain of financial influence in the U.S. reception and publication of foreign literature?
In 1983, Granta magazine devoted an entire issue to twenty of the Best of Young British Novelists. In doing so, the magazine created a snapshot of a generation of writers about to come into their own. Every ten years since, they’ve selected a roster of new talent to showcase.
Sunday
May 05
2:00 pm-4:00 pm
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet C. K. Williams and former PEN President Edmund Keeley will read from their new works and explore various related topics, from political imprisonment to the inevitability of our own dying.
Sunday
May 05
3:00 pm-4:30 pm
Designed to reveal hidden literary and political realities, Haiti In Two Acts plays out in two parts. Act I: An expert delivers remarks about the country. Act II: Local writers respond to questions raised.
Sunday
May 05
3:00 pm-4:30 pm
Two of Burma’s most esteemed poets, Zeyar Lynn and Khin Aung Aye, will read from their work and discuss the country’s budding literary scene with the editor of Bones Will Crow, the first anthology of contemporary Burmese poetry to be published in the West.
Sunday
May 05
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

participants

 

This year, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Sonia Sotomayor will deliver the Arthur Miller Freedom to Write Lecture. The lecture will be Followed by a Conversation with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

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